Tag Archives: 2013

Navicat SSH Tunnel Error – 2013 Lost connection to MySQL server

This post is for anyone out there running any Navicat database tools.  The company, PremiumSoft, that makes the line of Navicat tools is probably best known for there incredible database administration tool, Navicat.  That’s where I first found them.  They make a database admin tool that can connect to MySQL, MS SQL Server, Oracle, SQLite and everything in between.  Aside from being able to connect to just about anything that stores data, once connected you can do so many cool things with your databases in the name of database administration, that it would take me a week to create a post for it all.  Besides, this post isn’t a commercial for Navicat, but I did have to share just how good this product is.  Believe me, it is amazing, and now they have this really wicked data modelling tool that works hand in hand with the database admin tool.  You need to see it to believe it.  Check out their site [link], they have very good demos and lots of information about the products.

My apologies, I digress, the main purpose of my post was to inform any people already using Navicat or any of the other PremiumSoft products about a problem I ran into and a way to fix it.  I am using the software with MySQL databases primarily, but I believe the principle of the fix will apply to any database and server out there, especially Linux.

Now, one of the really cool things about the database admin and data modeling tools is that they can connect to your database via a SSH (Secure Shell Port 22) tunnel, instead of the normal default and usually plain text method.  For example, by default, when you connect to a MySQL server, the username and password you give to the server is sent in plain text, so anyone can read it.  Any command you type on that database console is also sent in plain text, so anyone can read it.  Think about the new user you just created for your new web hosting customer. What if their database username and password fell into the wrong hands.  It might be bad, it might not, it might be localized just to that one customer/user which would be bad enough, but suppose they found an exploit and got root on your server.  Now they have all of your data.  Even if you don’t have any data that is secret, just the hassle alone, not to mention explaining all of this to your customer(s) make this a really bad day.

This isn’t usually a big concern if you are running the database on the same server as the web server (which is common practice in many hosting scenarios), and if your database tools are on the server like the MySQL command line tools and such.  But what if you want to connect to the database from say, your PC?  Like you would do if using a database admin tool like Navicat.  You certainly don’t want all of the data that you will be sending back and forth to be in plain text, right?  Well, now you don’t have to leave it in plain text!  You can setup the connection in Navicat to connect to the Secure Shell server, which means you have an encrypted connection and not plain text.  Then, you can use the SSH tunnel that was created to connect to the database server itself.  What this means is that you use the SSH server to redirect your communications to the database server locally, so no one can see it.  Just like you were sitting at the server itself.

I’ll run through it again real quick, see if this makes sense.  The connection between your PC and the server running database is now encrypted and secure from prying eyes because instead of connecting to the database server directly, you are connecting to the Secure Shell server.  It is now the Secure Shell server that takes your communication and hands it off to the database server internally, so it’s safe from anyone watching outside.  It’s really cool, and just another reason I love the Navicat product so much.  Not to mention Linux as well!

The problem that I found was this, when I created the link to the SSH server in order to talk to the MySQL server, it wouldn’t connect.  I would get the connection to the SSH server, but when it then tried to talk to the database server, the database server kicked it out like no connection could be made.  I tried connecting locally from the Linux console think that maybe I killed some MySQL process that listens for connections, but it was working fine.  I tried it again and again but it just didn’t work.  The error I was getting from Navicat was this:

2013 – Lost connection to MySQL server at ‘reading initial communication packet’, system error: 0

I did some digging and found a basic setting to check.  This didn’t fix the problem, but I thought I would share it here since it has to be set in order for the tunnel to work:

  1. In the sshd config file (/etc/ssh/sshd.config) make sure that AllowTcpForwarding is enabled, because the default is disabled in most cases.

What I finally found to be causing the problem, was TCP_WRAPPERS.  Naturally, in my hosts.allow file I had the IP address of my PC in there, so that I could connect to the server.  So at first this seemed odd that this was my problem.  However, when you think about it, it makes sense.  The connection that is coming to the MySQL server originates not from my PC, but from the SSH server itself.  That’s right, because my connection stops at the SSH server, and then the SSH server sends the data to the database server.  This is a simplified view of things, but it should work to illustrate what’s going on.  Therefore, the simple fix was to add mysqld: localhost or 127.0.0.1 to the hosts.allow file in order to allow the traffic to go through TCP_WRAPPERS and to the MySQL server.  I read more about this once I worked it out, and I saw some “technicians” offering the solution of adding mysqld: ALL to their hosts.allow file.  Egads! I said!  Technically that would work, but damn, don’t open it up to allow everyone into your databases!!!  Just add localhost or 127.0.0.1 and you will be fine, and you will keep out the other riff raff.  I hope this helps some of you out there, enjoy!